- Skip to main content
cline library logo

PBC Occupational Therapy

Library Resources for Occupational Therapy

What are meta-analyses articles? Meta-analyses are a type of article that builds off one or more systematic review articles. The authors look at all the primary-source research articles that were analyzed in a systematic review article, they gather and pool together data from these articles, and then they use statistical analysis on the data to see what trends can be identified for the most effective healthcare interventions. 

What are systematic review articles? Systematic reviews are a type of article where the authors collect and critically analyze multiple, primary-source, research articles (mostly randomized, controlled trials) and then determine what those articles collectively tell us about the most effective healthcare interventions. 

♦ DATABASES FOR FINDING META-ANALYSES AND SYSTEMATIC REVIEW ARTICLES ♦ 

What are Randomized Controlled Trials (RCT) articles?  These are articles that describe clinical studies in which people are allocated at random to receive one of several clinical interventions. One of these interventions is the standard of comparison or control. RCTs seek to measure and compare the outcomes after the participants receive the interventions. Because the outcomes are measured, RCTs are quantitative studies.

What are all those other primary-source articles in the pyramid at the top of the page? Consult this excellent list of types of clinical studies for details. 

♦ DATABASES FOR FINDING RCTs AND OTHER PRIMARY-SOURCE ARTICLES ♦ 

What are Practice Guidelines?

They are not listed in the pyramid shown at the top of this page, but they are developed from a close examination of systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and other studies. Practice Guidelines are systematically developed statements that outline current best practices to inform health care professionals and patients in making clinical decisions. Guidelines are produced after an extensive review of the literature and are typically created by professional associations, government agencies, and/or public or private organizations.

Good guidelines clearly define the topic; appraise and summarize the best evidence regarding prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, therapy, harm, and cost-effectiveness; and identify the decision points where this information should be integrated with clinical experience and patient wishes to determine practice. 

Practice guidelines are also known as "Evidence-based guidelines" and "Clinical guidelines."

♦ DATABASES FOR FINDING PRACTICE GUIDELINES 

  To find background information, try these resources: 

Where else can you find background information?

  • Background information can be found in Books (and eBooks) -- using the tabs above. 
  • Background information can be found in article databases, like PubMed and CINAHL (found on the Articles tab) by limiting to certain publication types such as: review articles, book chapters, etc.
  1. Go to Cline Library's home page.
  2. If you are searching for a specific book, enter the title into the Quick Search box. If you want e-books on a topic, enter the topic into the Quick Search box.
  3. Using the limiters on the left-hand side, select Books located under Material Type. You may need to select Show More to see books.
  4. Under Availability select  Full Text Online
  5. Select the link for Online Access located at the bottom of the record.

Quick Search Limits

Ebook record

The eBooks listed below are just a sample of NAU Libraries' eBook collection. You can also find and read additional OT ebooks through U of A Libraries (on-campus access only).

  1. Go to Cline Library's home page.
  2. If you are searching for a specific book, enter the title into the Quick Search box. If you want books on a topic, enter the topic into the Quick Search box.
  3. Using the limiters on the left-hand side, select Books located under Material Type. You may need to select Show More to see books.
  4. Under Availability select Available in the Library
  5. Often we have multiple editions of the same book, these will be grouped together under the heading Multiple Versions.
  6. The call number is located at the bottom of the record.

Quick Search limiters

Book record


Evaluate journals:

  Search for videos


  Video collections:


  Image collections:

  About the anatomical models

 

  • Available during staffed hours for in-library use only.

  • Some are stored on the shelf, while others are in a backroom; see library staff for assistance.
  • Check out models with library staff before and after use.  

Available models

Brain 4-part (4 copies)

Brain Ventricle (4 copies)

Ear Model (1 copy)

Ear, 3 times life-size, 6-part (4 copies)

Eye, 5 times full-size, 12-part (1 copy)

Eye, 5 times full-size, 6-part (3 copies)

Female Pelvis, 6-parts (1 copy)

Foot Skeleton (2 copies)

Foot Skeleton Model (2 copies)

Functional Larynx, 2.5 times full-size (2 copies)

Functional Shoulder Joint (4 copies)

Hand Skeleton Model (4 copies)

Heart model 5-part on base (3 copies)

Heart Model enlarged about 2 times (2 copies)

Knee Joint (1 copy)

Larynx, 2 times full-size (2 copies)

Life-size Auditory Ossicles (1 copy)

Liver with Gall Bladder (4 copies)

Median Section of the Head (4 copies)

Nose with Paranasal Sinuses (2 copies)

Rear Organs Upper Abdomen (4 copies)

Shoulder Joint (4 copies)

Sinus Model (1 copy)

Skull with Facial Muscles (4 copies)

Skull, 22 pieces with video (1 copy)

Spinal Cord with Nerve Endings (4 copies)

Spine with Femur Heads, Flexible (1 copy)

Torso-Dual Sex (1 copy)

Torso-Dual Sex, Female Sex Organs (1 copy)

Torso-Dual Sex, Male Sex Organs (1 copy)

Torso-Unisex, Open Neck and Back, 18-part (1 copy)

Tests, measures, and instruments

Learn about grants and non-profits


Search for grants:


Learn about grant opportunities for NAU graduate students:


Community Health Needs Assessments (CHNAs):

Loading